10 Best Vegetables You Can Still Grow In The Fall – Vote

These veggies actually thrive once the sunniest days of summer are past. Vote for your favorite fall-grown veggie, add your own to the list, and come back to see which yummy vegetable wins the vote!

#1 Arugula

Give your salads a kick with this spicy green (try it in arugula pesto). Toepfer says arugula is ideal for planting in fall because it will taste bitter if temperatures are too warm. It grows quickly, too—you can harvest most varieties within 35 days of sprouting, making it perfect for a short growing season.
HOW TO PLANT
Sow seeds in rows about ¼ inch deep, and keep the soil moist until the seed germinates. Toepfer recommends planting seeds every week or two to ensure a continuous harvest throughout the fall.

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#2 Turnips

Don’t turn your nose up at this root veggie! There are dozens of ways to eat them, from salads to stews to sides, and they grow best in cool weather. In fact, waiting to harvest turnips until after the first frost actually improves their flavor.
HOW TO PLANT
Sow seeds about ½ inch deep in loose soil. After sprouts appear, thin seedlings to 2-3 inches apart. If you plant too late for roots to develop, you can always feast on the tops, just like beet greens.

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#3 Kohlrabi

If you’ve never grown this unusual-looking vegetable, now’s a good time to start. Its signature bulb-like stem can be added raw to salads, but you can also roast and steam them, or throw them in a soup. The leaves are a great addition to a salad, too. Harvest when they’re young for more flavor.
HOW TO PLANT
Sow seeds about ¼ inch deep, 10 to a foot-long row. Thin seedlings to 4 inches apart. Harvest when the bulbs are 2 to 3 inches in diameter to prevent them from becoming tough.

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#4 Spinach

Hot weather makes spinach bitter, so it’s actually best when grown during the refreshing days of autumn. Some varieties are even hardy enough to overwinter and be harvested in spring if you give them some protection.
HOW TO PLANT
Sow seeds in loose soil 6 to 8 weeks before the first frost, and thin seedlings to 4 to 6 inches apart. Keep plants evenly watered as dry spells will encourage the plants to bolt.

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#5 Radishes

You may associate radishes with spring delicacies, like sautéed radishes with garlic greens, but they taste just as good in autumn. They mature in as little as three weeks, so chances are you can get in several plantings in one season—space plantings about 10 days apart so you have a continuous supply.
HOW TO GROW
Work soil at least 6 inches deep, and sow seeds ½ inch deep and 1 inch apart. Water regularly for best flavor, and thin seedlings to 2 inches apart. Repeat.

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#6 Broccoli

While you can grow broccoli in spring and summer, it does best in fall’s more stable growing conditions. You’ll get bigger, sweeter heads in cool weather.
HOW TO GROW
Space plants at least 18 inches apart, and keep about 24 inches in between rows. Broccoli prefers slightly acidic soil, so do one of these easy soil tests to make sure you’ve got the right growing conditions. You may also want to consider a cold frame or cover tunnels to keep plants from freezing.

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#7 Kale

The darling of the health-food world is also the king of cool weather. Once it matures, you can keep on harvesting even after the first snowfall. Plant 6 to 8 weeks before the first frost.
HOW TO GROW
Plant seeds ¼ to ½ inch deep, and later thin to 8 to 10 inches apart. Use mulch to protect roots and keep soil moist.

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#8 Mustard Greens

Tangy mustard greens are the salad ingredient you’ve been missing out on. Harvest the leaves when they’re young for the best flavor.
HOW TO GROW
Loose leaf varieties are your best bet, as they will mature in 45 days, while heading mustards need 60 to 75 days. Start by planting seeds 6 inches apart, later thinning to 10 inches, leaving 10 to 12 inches between rows. Plant a small amount every two weeks for a continuous crop.

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#9 Lettuce

Lettuce is one of your most reliable options for cool-weather planting. It’s very frost-tolerant and can handle temperatures even down in the 20s, so an unexpected cold snap won’t finish it off. Plus, you can harvest baby leaves as well as mature ones, so your crop never goes to waste.
HOW TO GROW
Like mustard greens, select loose-leaf varieties that mature more quickly. Sow lettuce in rows about 8 to 10 inches apart, and thin when the seedlings have 3 to 4 leaves (you can eat the thinnings on a salad). If you’re growing baby lettuce, there’s no need to thin the rows.

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#10 Collard Greens

You probably associate collard greens with southern cooking (like chicken with sweet potatoes and collard greens), but they belong in gardens in colder climes, too. “Collards can tolerate temperatures as low as 10 degrees, which makes them an especially good crop to grow in the fall in all parts of the country. Frost is said to sweeten the flavor, too,” Toepfer says.
HOW TO GROW
Plant seeds ¼ to ½ inch deep in full sun. It’s important not to let the soil dry out, so water consistently, especially if you don’t have much rain. Harvest the greens after the first frost.

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