17 Must See Sites in New York City

If you have the chance to visit New York City, you won’t want to miss these sites!!

#1 The Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World; French: La Liberté éclairant le monde) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York City, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.

The Statue of Liberty is a figure of a robed woman representing Libertas, a Roman goddess. She holds a torch above her head with her right hand, and in her left hand carries a tabula ansata inscribed in Roman numerals with "JULY IV MDCCLXXVI" (July 4, 1776), the date of the U.S. Declaration of Independence. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue became an icon of freedom and of the United States, and was a welcoming sight to immigrants arriving from abroad.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statue_of_Liberty)

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#2 911 Memorial

Honoring the lives of those who were lost is atthe heart of our mission. Occupying eight of the 16 acres at the World TradeCenter, the Memorial is a tribute to the past and a place of hope for thefuture. (https://www.911memorial.org/memorial)

 

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#3 Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is quite possibly the most iconic landmark in the world. Find yourself in the center of it all at the highest open-air observatory in all of New York. The 86th Floor of the Empire State Building is in countless movies and television scenes. The Observation Deck wraps around the building’s spire, providing 360-degree views of New York and beyond. From up here you will get one-of-a-kind views of Central Park, The Hudson River and East River, The Brooklyn Bridge, Times Square, The Statue of Liberty, and much more. Our multi-media handheld device teaches you about your view from every direction.

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#4 The Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge looms majestically over New York City’s East River, linking the two boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. Since 1883, its granite towers and steel cables have offered a safe and scenic passage to millions of commuters and tourists, trains and bicycles, pushcarts and cars. The bridge’s construction took 14 years, involved 600 workers and cost $15 million (more than $320 million in today’s dollars). At least two dozen people died in the process, including its original designer. Now more than 125 years old, this iconic feature of the New York City skyline still carries roughly 150,000 vehicles and pedestrians every day. (http://www.history.com/topics/brooklyn-bridge)

 

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#5 Times Square

Formerly Longacre Square, Times Square was named in 1904 after the New York Times tower. The newspaper first posted current headlines along its famous moving sign, the world's first, in 1928. Long the heart of the Theater District, Times Square fell into decay during the Depression when many theaters shut down. The city cleaned up the area by inviting corporations such as Disney to move into the area. Today, Times Square has become a much safer place, day and night, with shopping, theaters and restaurants galore, not to mention its mammoth billboards.

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#6 Central Park

On July 21, 1853, the New York State Legislature enacted into law the setting aside of more than 750 acres of land central to Manhattan Island to create America's first major landscaped public park; they would soon refer to it as "the Central Park." Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, the winners of the 1858 design competition for Central Park, along with other socially conscious reformers understood that the creation of a great public park would improve public health and contribute greatly to the formation of a civil society. Immediately, the success of Central Park fostered the urban park movement, one of the great hallmarks of democracy of nineteenth century America.  (http://www.centralparknyc.org/visit/park-history.html)

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#7 Rockefeller Plaza

With 19 high-rises built on 22 acres of prime Manhattan real estate, it’s easy to take this National Landmark for granted. Yet when business tycoon John D. Rockefeller broke ground on the massive complex in 1930, it helped the city weather the Great Depression by employing an estimated 40,000 with construction work. It’seven said that the first Christmas tree at the center was erected by the workers several years before the giant evergreen would become a tradition.These days, thousands are employed within the buildings and tourists come from all over to admire the original Art Deco structures and shops surrounding Rockefeller Plaza. 

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#8 Radio City Music Hall

When the stock market crashed in 1929, John D. Rockefeller,Jr. held a $91 million, 24-year lease on a piece of midtown Manhattan property properly known as “the speakeasy belt.” Plans to gentrify the neighborhood by building a new Metropolitan Opera House on the site were dashed by the failing economy and the business outlook was dim. Nevertheless, Rockefeller made a bold decision that would leave a lasting impact on the city’s architectural and cultural landscape. He decided to build an entire complex of buildings on the property-buildings so superior that they would attract commercial tenants even in a depressed city flooded with vacant rental space. The project would express the highest ideals of architecture and design and stand as a symbol of optimism and hope.

The search for a commercial partner led to the Radio Corporation of America, a young company whose NBC radio programs were attracting huge audiences and whose RKO studios were producing and distributing popular motion pictures that offered welcome diversion in hard times.Rockefeller’s financial power and RCA’s media might were joined by the unusual talents of impresario S.L. “Roxy” Rothafel. Roxy had earned a reputation as a theatrical genius by employing an innovative combination of vaudeville, movies and razzle-dazzle decor to revive struggling theaters across America. Together Rockefeller, RCA and Roxy realized a fantastic dream—a theater unlike any in the world, and the first completed project within the complex that RCA head David Sarnoff dubbed “Radio City.” Radio City Music Hall was to be a palace for the people. A place of beauty offering high-quality entertainment at prices ordinary people could afford. It was intended to entertain and amuse, but also to elevate and inspire. (https://www.msg.com/radio-city-music-hall/history)

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#9 Ellis Island

Ellis Island is a historical site that opened in 1892 as an immigration station, a purpose it served for more than 60 years until it closed in 1954. Located at the mouth of Hudson River between New York and New Jersey, Ellis Island saw millions of newly arrived immigrants pass through its doors–in fact, it has been estimated that close to 40 percent of all current U.S. citizens can trace at least one of their ancestors to Ellis Island. When Ellis Island opened, a great change was taking place in U. S. immigration. Fewer arrivals were coming from northern and western Europe–Germany, Ireland, Britain and the Scandinavian countries–as more and more immigrants poured in from southern and Eastern Europe. Among this new generation were Jews escaping from political and economic oppression in czarist Russia and Eastern Europe (some 484,000 arrived in 1910 alone) and Italians escaping poverty in their country. There were also Poles,Hungarians, Czechs, Serbs, Slovaks and Greeks, along with non-Europeans from Syria, Turkey and Armenia.

The reasons they left their homes in the Old World included war, drought, famine and religious persecution, and all had hopes for greater opportunity in the New World. After an arduous sea voyage, immigrants arriving at Ellis Island were tagged with information from their ship’s registry; they then waited on long lines for medical and legal inspections to determine if they were fit for entry into the United States.

From 1900 to 1914–the peak years of Ellis Island’s operation–some 5,000 to 10,000 people passed through the immigration station every day. Approximately 80 percent successfully passed through in a matter of hours, but others could be detained for days or weeks. Many immigrants remained in New York, while others traveled by barge to railroad stations in Hoboken or Jersey City, NJ, on their way to destinations across the country. (http://www.history.com/topics/ellis-island)

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#10 St. Patrick’s Cathedral

The story of New York’s greatcathedral mirrors the story of the city itself. Created to affirm theascendance of religious freedom and tolerance, St. Patrick’s Cathedral wasbuilt in the democratic spirit, paid for not only by the contributions ofthousands of poor immigrants but also by the largesse of 103 prominent citizenswho pledged $1,000 each. St. Patrick’s Cathedral proves the maxim that nogeneration builds a cathedral. It is rather, a kind of ongoing conversation linkinggenerations past, present and future.The cornerstone of St. Patrick’s Cathedral was laid in 1858 and her doors swept open in 1879. It was over 150 years ago when Archbishop John Hughes announced his inspired ambition to build the “new” St. Patrick’s Cathedral. (https://saintpatrickscathedral.org/history-heritage)

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#11 The Chrysler Building

You’ve probably seen the Chrysler Building, New York in countless films and photos. But nothing will prepare you for seeing the Art Deco-style skyscraper up close. It’s simply beautiful.

Walter P. Chrysler (the car maker) built the Chrysler Building as a status symbol. He was in a race with the Bank of Manhattan to win the title of ‘tallest building in the world’. Just when it looked like his rival had won, Chrysler pulled out his secret weapon – a huge spire. When this was put in place it made the Chrysler Building 1,045 feet (318 meters). In fact, in 1929 it was the first building to top what was until then the tallest structure – the Eiffel Tower in Paris. (https://www.bigbustours.com/en/new-york/new-york-landmarks-chrysler-building/)

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#12 The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met)

Perhaps no word describes the Met as well as "encyclopedic." With nearly 3,000,000 works in its vaults that span 5,000 years, the museum can display only a fraction at a time.

The modern art section emphasizes mostly American paintings. The 19th-century European painting collection contains many great Impressionist and Post-Impressionist canvases. The European Paintings collection has Italian masterpieces as well as Dutch and Flemish works.

The American wing has the nation's finest collection of American painting, sculpture and decorative arts. Its Engelhard Court has fine examples of neoclassical and Beaux-Arts monumental sculpture and stained-glass windows by Tiffany. Nineteen period rooms date from 1680 (the Hart Room) to 1914 (the Frank Lloyd Wright Room).

The medieval art section encompasses the 4th through the 16th centuries. Strengths include early Christian and Byzantine silver and jewelry of the barbarian tribes.

The collections of the Asian Art section are from China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia. They date from the third millennium B.C. to the present. The re-creation of the Ming scholar's garden, with its rock garden and spring, is enchanting.

Works of ancient Near Eastern art range from the 6th millennium B.C. to the Arab conquest in A.D. 626 and come from Mesopotamia, Iran, Syria and Anatolia among other areas.

The Greek and Roman galleries cover several civilizations: works from the Classical period, pre-Greek artwork of the eastern Mediterranean and the pre-Roman art of Italy. The glass and silver holdings are considered among the finest in the world.

The Egyptian section includes jewelry from the Middle and New Kingdoms, sculpture depicting Queen Hatshepsut, and the Temple of Dendur, commanding a vast hangar-like space in the north wing.

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#13 Wall Street

Wall Street an actual street by that name is located in Lower Manhattan in New York City. The street acts as the epicenter of the city's Financial District. The name of the street originates from an actual wall that was built in the 17th century by the Dutch, who were living in what was then called New Amsterdam. The 12-foot (4 meter) wall was built to protect the Dutch against attacks from pirates and various Native American tribes, and to keep other potential dangers out of the establishment.

The area near the wall became known as Wall Street. Because of its prime location running the width of Manhattan between the East River and the Hudson River the road developed into one of the busiest trading areas in the entire city. Later, in 1699, the wall was dismantled by the British colonial government, but the name of the street stuck.

The financial industry got its official start on Wall Street on May 17, 1792. On that day, New York's first official stock exchange was established by the signing of the Buttonwood Agreement. The agreement, so-called because it was signed under a buttonwood tree that early traders and speculators had previously gathered around to trade informally, gave birth to what is now the modern-day New York Stock Exchange NYSE.(https://www.livescience.com/32563-why-is-it-called-wall-street.html)

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#14 Little Italy

Little Italy welcomes a heavily tourist crowd to its high concentration of souvenir shops and traditional Italian eateries and bakeries. Tenement buildings, once home to the immigrants who settled the area in the late 1800's, line the narrow streets. Mulberry Street, the main thoroughfare, turns into a pedestrian mall on summer weekends.(https://www.google.com/search?q=little+italy+nyc&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjdsfKFoOTWAhUn04MKHf-YAn8Q_AUICSgA&biw=1680&bih=919&dpr=1)

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#15 Yankee Stadium

Yankee Stadium was a stadium located in the Bronx, a borough of New York City. It was the home ballpark of the New York Yankees, one of the city's Major League Baseball(MLB) franchises, from 1923 to 1973 and then from 1976 to 2008. The stadium hosted 6,581 Yankees regular season home games during its 85-year history. It was also the former home of the New York Giants football team from 1956 through the first part of the 1973–74 football season. The stadium's nickname, "The House That Ruth Built",[3] is derived from Babe Ruth, the baseball superstar whose prime years coincided with the stadium's opening and the beginning of the Yankees' winning history. It has also been known as "The Big Ballpark in The Bronx", "The Stadium", and "The Cathedral of Baseball".

The stadium was built from 1922 to 1923 for $2.4 million ($33.9 million in 2016 dollars). The stadium's construction was paid for entirely by Yankees owner Jacob Ruppert, who was eager to have his own stadium after sharing the Polo Grounds with the New York Giants baseball team the previous 10 years. Yankee Stadium opened for the 1923 MLB season and at the time; it was hailed as a one-of-a-kind facility in the country for its size. Over the course of its history, it became one of the most famous venues in the United States, having hosted a variety of events and historic moments during its existence. While many of these moments were baseball-related—including World Series games, no-hitters, perfect games and historic home runs—the stadium also hosted boxing matches, the 1958 NFL Championship Game, concerts, Jehovah's Witnesses conventions (see record attendance) and three Papal Masses. The stadium went through many alterations and playing surface configurations over the years. The condition of the facility worsened in the 1960's and 1970's, prompting its closing for renovation from 1974 to 1975. The renovation significantly altered the appearance of the venue and reduced the distance of the outfield fences.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yankee_Stadium_(1923))

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#16 Madison Square Garden

Madison Square Garden, indoor sports arena in New York City. The original Madison Square Garden (1874) was a converted railroad station at Madison Square; in 1891 a sports arena was built on the site, designed by Stanford White and dedicated chiefly to boxing. In 1925 a new Madison Square Garden was built at Eighth Avenue and 50th Street, with an arena suitable for basketball, hockey, and other sports; it was the site of several notable political gatherings, including the deadlocked Democratic National Convention of 1924. The present arena, opened in 1968 on the site of the former Pennsylvania Station, Eighth Avenue and 33rd Street, is a large complex containing a 20,000-seat arena for circuses, ice shows, and conventions, as well as for sports events; a 5,000-seat forum; an exposition rotunda; a bowling center; a sports hall of fame; and a gallery of sports art. A renovation of the complex was completed in 1991. (https://www.britannica.com/topic/Madison-Square-Garden)

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#17 The Apollo Theater

The Apollo Theater at 253 West 125th Street between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard and Frederick Douglass Boulevard in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City is a music hall, which is a noted venue for African-American performers. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Theater)

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